3-D Dressing

Healing Wounds with 3-D Dressing

Yes! 3-D is everywhere, even in dressing wounds and healing them.

Researchers from ITMO University and the University of Toronto have developed gelatin and nanocrystalline-based material that can accelerate the wound healing process (3-D Dressing) while keeping antibiotic-resistant bacteria at bay.

3D healing

Bacteria is a tiny little creature. It learns and build resistance to antibiotics and passes it on to the off springs (which, by the way it produces in millions). Hence, the Super-Becteria.

A joint effort against the tiny (mighty) enemy

As a part of a joint grant project, researchers have developed a hydrogel using modified nanocrystalline cellulose and gelatin, that not only favors cell growth but also prevents bacterial reproduction.

“A wound dressing must possess antibacterial qualities in order to, at the very least, not cause an infection. There is now a global trend of reducing the use of conventional antibacterial products due to bacteria developing antibiotic resistance. We have suggested an alternative way of dealing with this issue,” says Dr. Elena Koshel, an associate professor at ITMO University’s ChemBio Cluster.

What’s more, it also indicates when the 3-D dressing needs to be changed!

“Because cellulose is able to adsorb iron (III) ions which provide nutrition to bacteria, the material prevents the spread of infection. Furthermore, by modifying it with carbon nanodots, we have made it optically active—exposure to ultraviolet light causes it to emit a glow in the blue band of the spectrum. If the bandage has yet to exhaust its ability to adsorb ions, it will produce an optical response; if it is completely covered in ions, no response will be produced,” explains Dr. Elena Krivoshapkina, an associate professor at ITMO University’s ChemBio Cluster.

Here you can read the official publication: Nanocolloidal Hydrogel with Sensing and Antibacterial Activities Governed by Iron Ion Sequestration

3-D … and Smart too…